Sunday, June 26, 2016

DOWN HOME FLYFISHING: The 17 Year Itch Cicada

While driving up to Michigan the other day I received a message from Dave Zielinski of Down Home Flyfishing to get to his waters NOW for some crazy good fishing.  I had to pass this time around but when the cicada pop off again, I'm making a road trip for sure.

Dave was kind enough to send along a fly tutorial for his 17 Year Itch Cicada and a few images just to show you that it works.


Dave wrote...  "It's been epic fishing lately.  It's waning, but man, was it good.  Good like twenty-nine carp in one afternoon.   The way they eat a cicada is intense and in real life slo-motion!  We have been fishing Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and some of eastern Ohio too.

They circulate a pool or eddy on the river, with their backs sometimes out of the water.  The way their eyes are positioned, makes it tough for them to look up and eat.  So when they find a bug, they swim downstream of it, line up with it floating down, raise their heads, open wide and "find" it.  You have to train yourself to wait...wait...wait....SET!

The video tutorial for my "17 Year Itch Cicada" is not a realistic type of pattern but that really doesn't matter.  Black. Orange. 1-1/2" long body.  We fished this fly exclusively and had no refusals.  The fly holds up well, but pay attention to the super glue steps.  To fish it, do not use a silicone floatant on the foam.  That will make it ride way to high.  You want it in the film."








Visit the Down Home Flyfishing website for more goodness and follow along on Instagram too. Oh yeah, DZ's Flickr account is a fun flip through as well.

DOWN HOME FLYFISHING: The 17 Year Itch Cicada

While driving up to Michigan the other day I received a message from Dave Zielinski of Down Home Flyfishing to get to his waters NOW for some crazy good fishing.  I had to pass this time around but when the cicada pop off again, I'm making a road trip for sure.

Dave was kind enough to send along a fly tutorial for his 17 Year Itch Cicada and a few images just to show you that it works.


Dave wrote...  "It's been epic fishing lately.  It's waning, but man, was it good.  Good like twenty-nine carp in one afternoon.   The way they eat a cicada is intense and in real life slo-motion!  We have been fishing Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and some of eastern Ohio too.

They circulate a pool or eddy on the river, with their backs sometimes out of the water.  The way their eyes are positioned, makes it tough for them to look up and eat.  So when they find a bug, they swim downstream of it, line up with it floating down, raise their heads, open wide and "find" it.  You have to train yourself to wait...wait...wait....SET!

The video tutorial for my "17 Year Itch Cicada" is not a realistic type of pattern but that really doesn't matter.  Black. Orange. 1-1/2" long body.  We fished this fly exclusively and had no refusals.  The fly holds up well, but pay attention to the super glue steps.  To fish it, do not use a silicone floatant on the foam.  That will make it ride way to high.  You want it in the film."








Visit the Down Home Flyfishing website for more goodness and follow along on Instagram too.

FIND YOUR WATER: Farming Fish

Redington's latest Find Your Water episode gives you the behind the curtains look on what it takes to build this video series. 



It's not always easy to make these films and a lot of work goes into each one from prep to film to edit.

Visit the Redington website for more great videos and of course, gear.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Always Have A Backup Plan - A Day With East Anglers

On the way home from Charleston on Saturday afternoon I was scratching my head on what to do on Sunday.  I could fish the family pond.  I could always work outside, mow, trim, and weed the garden boxes.  I could also get everything prepped for Beaver Island, Michigan.  Or, I could call Ben Moore from East Anglers and see if he wanted to fish.  A couple text messages, a phone call, and our day was set.  We'd float the Savannah River that splits Georgia and South Carolina and look for smallmouth.

It's always good to have a backup plan.  I've wanted to fish this river again since our last float a couple years ago.


Since it's been blistering hot, Ben suggested that we get an early start and met at a gas station just after 7 a.m.  We dropped off my vehicle at the take out and then ran up river to drop in.  The Savannah River is a really beautiful stretch of water and levels and clarity were excellent on this trip.

It was a beautiful morning and we started with poppers and dry flies but soon changed over to dark colored buggers to run deep through the shoals.  It took a little while to get things started but as morning moved over to early afternoon things started turning around.  Ben fought two large smallmouth that likely pushed four pounds but came both came unbuttoned before we could get them into the net.  No worries since it was great to see that they were there.  Even more important, we caught quite a few different age class fish from small to medium in size.  It's excellent to see the next generations in the river as well.

All in all a great day on the water with Ben and since he's leaving to guide in Montana for the summer soon, our last chance to fish together before he comes back in the fall.












Ben Moore runs low drag without a website and posts regularly on the East Anglers Facebook page.  Follow him there and if you're interested in getting on the schedule for the fall, send him an email at eastanglers@gmail.com.

Jose's "Last One"

Growing up I watched a lot of Spanish Fly and this is a great last episode. 



Several years have passed since Jose's untimely death and it's still hard to believe that he's gone. 

Monday, June 20, 2016

Saturday Morning At The Flood Tide Co. Lab

This past weekend I made a quick run down to Charleston with some hopes of geting on the water and look for a redfish or whatever.  A broken boat, lousy weather, and busy guide friends changed my plans once I was there but thankful to Paul Puckett and Will Abbott at Flood Tide Co. for letting me crash on their couch for a night.


On Saturday morning before leaving, I walked around the house that the Flood Tide Co. calls home and snapped some images with my 50mm lens.  I am always interested in where inspiration comes from and the Flood Tide Co. building is one part studio for artist Paul Puckett, one part office and warehouse for their growing apparel company, and then one part living room (call it a lounge or think tank) with sound equipment to record the "Barely Live" podcast, day drink, hold "business" meetings, or whatever other hijinks happen along the way.

I dig seeing where artists and small businesses work and from paint brushes to baby doll heads to vinyl LPs, the Flood Tide Co. lab is one wonderfully weird place.  Here's a few images from my walk through on Saturday morning before leaving.




















Thanks again boys for the place to rest me head.  Proof that I'm not too old to couch surf though I wish I had brought a towel for the shower as I had to dry off with a couple small wash cloths I found at Publix.  It worked but didn't really work at the same time.

Check out the Flood Tide Co. website and like I mentioned in "10 For Spring", use discount code "FIBERGLASS" for 15% off your order.  Promo code is good through tomorrow.

The Stimi Hatch: Small Stream Dry Fly Fishing

Dang, it's good to see Ivan from Yukon Goes Fishing working from behind the lens and edit room again.  Enjoy.



Need more?  Check out the website and play video after video from the past on the Vimeo page.